A Small Theory

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“People observe the colours of a day only at its beginnings and ends, but to me it’s quite clear that a day merges through a multitude of shades and intonations, with each passing moment. A single hour can consist of thousands of different colours. Waxy yellows, cloud-spat blues. Murky darknesses. In my line of work, I make it a point to notice them.” (Markus Zusak; The Book Thief)

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Mystical Dartmoor

It’s been too long since the last post about my England trip and I apologize for that. But now! I continue with a day-trip to the southern edge of England. Coming from Bristol we drove to Torquay and then (only slightly disappointed about the very touristy “English Riviera”) we made our way into the beautiful Dartmoor National Park. This is a report about a day full of adventure in a rough landscape, a quest for stone circles and criminal ponies…

Dartmoor National Park Continue reading

London in 3 days

When me and my boyfriend decided to visit London, I tried to recall memories of a student exchange to England many years ago. I must have been eleven years old or something but I remember quite a lot. Apart from being on the big wheel “London Eye” and feeding grey squirrels in Greenwich Park the most distinct memory I have is: Confusion. Now that I saw London again I can totally understand that again. For a tourist London is primarily a noisy city crammed with people. Around the world-famous destinations you can hardly move to left and right on the sidewalks, you are pushed forward by the crowd and traffic noise prevents any normal conversation. But it’s not only that. London is beautiful, London is impressive, multicultural and colorful. History calls you on every corner and there are green parks and street markets vibrating with life. To be honest it’s not fair to rush through it on only three days. You would have to spend a whole life there to understand London properly. But the little bit that I learned about this city I would like to share with you.

Piccadilly Circus London Underground

Piccadilly Circus, a pulsing heart in the center of London.

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I love Bremen

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I have lived my whole life in this city. When I was younger, I always wanted to move away as soon as I would graduate from school. I thought Bremen was too small, a little boring and had no good future opportunities. Although the latter is partly true because finding a job here is not easy, I think differently now. This city is really worth living in. It’s green, has old traditions and a lively night-life and I still discover parts of it that I never knew before. These photos are just a glimpse of Bremen’s beauty and I mean to show you other popular places as soon as I find time to take some pictures! 🙂

Part One: Twilight Hour in the Heart of the City

Bremen Schlachte Weser

Twilight hour above the Weser. You see the illuminated promenade “Schlachte” on the right side of the river.

Bremen Schlachte Weser

The Schlachte with its ship quays. The square tower with blue light in the distance is the Wesertower.

Bremen Rathaus

The town hall of Bremen, a UNESCO cultural heritage from 13th century.

Bremen Rathaus

On the left side you see the “Roland”, a statue of a knight that symbolizes the freedom of the city.

Bremen St Petri Dome

The St Petri Dome of Bremen is like the town hall one of the old historical building surrounding the central market place.

Festival Stories

Festivals are for the love of music, clearly. But they are also an opportunity to go hog-wild. I’ve just been on Hurricane Festival in Scheeßel, one of the biggest music festivals in Germany. It’s three days of playful anarchy. Don’t wash, don’t behave, shout at people, dance wildly, drink too much… altogether very interesting asocial behaviour, especially on the camping ground. I’m not saying I like everything people do there. Like peeing against your tent while you sleep. Or being so wasted that they feel the need to jump around completely naked (interestingly only men do this). But it is kind of liberating to get rid of civilized life once a year. 🙂

Hurricane Festival_3 Continue reading

“Visions for Nigeria” – Interview with James Olusanmi

Nigeria, in Southwest Africa, is a land troubled by many conflicts and social problems. You probably all heard of the terrorist organization Boko Haram, which riots in the North roughly since 2010. Recently, Nigeria elected a new president, Muhammadu Buhari – a former military dictator (from 1982-1985) who promised to wipe the terrorists out. It is far too early to say in which direction he will lead the country but he has been democratically elected and the change in power was peacefully. Still the country suffers from high poverty, unemployment and inflation – despite the fact that Nigeria is very oil-rich and the biggest market economy in sub-Saharan Africa.

Since about one year I am member of a non-profit organization in Bremen called “Human & Environment”. They work together with a grassroot NGO in Nigeria, founded by James Olusanmi. A few months ago, he was in Bremen and I took the chance to interview him about his home country.

James Olusanmi interview Nigeria Continue reading

Tweeting Eurovision

Every year I am surprised that it’s Eurovision Song Contest again. To be honest, I think this is a waste event. I got goosebumps because of more than one song yesterday, but not of the good kind. I confess, I watched it anyway and it actually was interesting this time, but not because of the show itself but the millions of tweets on #ESC2015. Did you ever do this, watch TV and simultaneously comment every minute on Twitter on what’s happening? Don’t you think that’s strange behaviour?? Not that I am in a position for a judgement as I did it myself yesterday – and the ESC is probably the only thing on TV where it really doesn’t matter if you pay attention or look on your smartphone. But it’s weird. Everybody wants to throw in their two cents; it seems nobody really cares about the music, it’s just a contest about the funniest tweet. Even some of the big journalistic media participated in the collective bitching. Subjectively, this was what most tweets were about: Continue reading

The question of the refugees

A few days ago I had a conversation with some people I usually really like (and think of as reasonable human beings) about the problem of the huge numbers of refugees coming to Europe at the moment. See, I normally avoid discussing controversial political topics, be it with friends, family or strangers, because I don’t need that stress and see no point in trying to persuade somebody of my worldview. I think the basis of tolerance is to allow somebody his own opinion and belief, whether you can understand it or not. But there are some limits, and that’s for example when it comes to the basics of human rights and justice – things everybody should share because of common sense. The question of the refugees is one of these basics. Continue reading